Category: tutorial

OpenSCAD as silicone molding form generator


scadmoldform1tryballs_revisited_3_finalAn alternative to 3d-printed sex toys are silicone toys. For making such a sex toy you need a molding form, where you pour in the silicone. If you use Tinkercad to build the form for the balls motive, you may need more than one hour. If you are not experienced in 3d constrcution it may take days. That’s ok and can be fun as you can realize your fantasies step by step.

 

 

molded-with-ueberh-querBut if you want to change a detail or want to resize some parts of it, it will take a long time as you have to unbuilt parts of the form, make changes and then reassemble. Sometimes building from scratch is faster.

In the last blog post we have introduced OpenSCAD to construct a sex toy form. Now we want to build a hull for the sex toy for overmolding.

The basic idea is very simple:

  • Generate two forms. The smaller one has the size of the sex toy you want to make. The larger one will be the form where you pour in the silicone.
  • Than use the OpenSCAD difference command which “subtracts” or cuts out the smaller form from the larger form.

But it is more complicated:

  • You have to include a frame otherwise the form would fall over.
  • You need two forms (A and b) so you could open the form after molding.
  • Both forms must be fastened together when molding. Therefore you need holes for tinkering wire.

bi-round-12-scadWe have created a solution for molding form generation which is as flexible as our OpenSCAD sex toy generator. In addition you can change the thickness of the frame. Therefore you have to change the variable frame_thickness.

The SCAD script uses the module base which is already introduced. The generation of the frame is done in the module frame. The frame consists of a base plate and two supporting frames which stabilize the whole form. In addition there are extensions to the frame in the upper part of the form. These extensions will provide holes for fastening both forms.

The module complete_form constructs the form which is tricky. The union command is used to join the complete outer form and the frame. Now we have a filled form and have to remove the inner part. This is done by subtracting another complete form which is a bit smaller than the outer form. This is done with the difference command.

Another module hole provides all holes for the tinkering wire. At last we construct part A and part B of the molding form. Again the difference command is used to cut out one half of the form. This is done by subtracting a cube which is placed in the middle of the complete form. In addition the holes must be subtracted from the complete form.

You can build in the body interaction vibrator development board to make a vibrating dildo, controlled by motion or by another body interaction vibrator development board. Read more here.

Try out with the Thingiverse customizer.

Download the zipped SCAD file here: bi1-round12

Or copy and paste the source code to the SCAD software:

// bodyinteraction toy form and mold form generator
// radius of bottom part
r_bottom=25; // [15:5:80] 
// height of bottom part
h_bottom=30; // [10:5:80] 
// top rounding of bottom part
rounding=10; // [10:5:20]
// radius of ball 1 
r_ball1=21; // [15:5:50] 
// radius of ball 2
r_ball2=15; // [15:5:50] 
//radius of ball 3 
r_ball3=11; // [15:5:50] 
// radius of connecting cylinders
connector_radius=8; // [10:2:20]
// distance between balls and bottom part
ball_distance=15; // [10:2:40]
// offset (thickness of hull)
o=2; 
// thickness of frame
frame_thickness=4; 

height=h_bottom+3*ball_distance+r_ball1*2+r_ball2*2+r_ball3*2; echo(height);


// form part A
translate([0,0,height+frame_thickness])rotate([0,180,0])
difference() {
 complete_form(r_bottom,h_bottom,rounding,r_ball1,r_ball2,r_ball3,connector_radius,ball_distance,o,frame_thickness,height);
union(){
 translate([-r_bottom-o-10,0,-5])
 color("red")cube([2*r_bottom+2*o+20,r_bottom+2*o,height+frame_thickness+5]);
 holes(height,h_bottom);
 }
}
//form part B
translate([90,0,height+frame_thickness])rotate([0,180,0])
difference() {
 complete_form(r_bottom,h_bottom,rounding,r_ball1,r_ball2,r_ball3,connector_radius,ball_distance,o,frame_thickness,height);
union(){
 translate([-r_bottom-o-10,-r_bottom-o-2-10,-5])
 color("red")cube([2*r_bottom+2*o+20,r_bottom+2*o+10,height+frame_thickness+5]);
 holes(height,h_bottom);
 }
}

module holes (height,h_bottom){
for (i=[h_bottom+30:10:height])
 translate([r_bottom-1,5,i])rotate([90,90,0])
 color("green")cylinder(h=15,r=1,$fn=20);

for (i=[0:10:h_bottom+20])
 translate([r_bottom-3+10,5,i])rotate([90,90,0])
 color("blue")cylinder(h=15,r=1,$fn=20);

for (i=[h_bottom+30:10:height])
 translate([-r_bottom+1,5,i])rotate([90,90,0])
 color("green")cylinder(h=15,r=1,$fn=20);
for (i=[0:10:h_bottom+20])
 translate([-r_bottom-6,5,i])rotate([90,90,0])
 color("blue")cylinder(h=15,r=1,$fn=20);
}

module complete_form (r_bottom,h_bottom,rounding,r_ball1,r_ball2,r_ball3,connector_radius,ball_distance,o,frame_thickness,height) {
 difference() {
 union() {
 base(r_bottom+o,h_bottom+o,rounding,connector_radius+o,ball_distance-2*o,r_ball1+o,r_ball2+o,r_ball3+o);
 //complete frame
 frame(2*r_bottom+2*o,o,height,frame_thickness,r_bottom,h_bottom,rounding);
 };
 base(r_bottom,h_bottom,rounding,connector_radius,ball_distance,r_ball1,r_ball2,r_ball3);
 
 
};
}

module frame(width,o,height,frame_thickness,r_bottom,h_bottom,rounding) {
 //plate
 translate([-width/2,-width/2-2*o,height]) cube(size=[width,width+2*o,frame_thickness]);
 //frame1
 translate([-width/2,-frame_thickness/2,0]) cube(size=[width,frame_thickness,height]);
 //frame 1 extensions
 translate([-width/2-010,-frame_thickness/2,-5]) color("blue")cube(size=[12,frame_thickness,60]);
 translate([-width/2-10,-frame_thickness/2,55]) color("red")rotate([0,45,0]) cube(size=[12,frame_thickness,20]);
 
 translate([+width/2-2,-frame_thickness/2,-5]) color("green")cube(size=[12,frame_thickness,60]);
 translate([+width/2+01,-frame_thickness/2,47]) color("green")rotate([0,-45,0]) cube(size=[12,frame_thickness,20]);
 //frame2
 translate([-frame_thickness/2,-width/2,0]) cube(size=[frame_thickness,width, ,
 height]);
 // stabilize bottom with cylinder
 color("green")translate([0,0,h_bottom])rotate([00,0,0180])
 cylinder(h=r_bottom*2-rounding*.5, r1= r_bottom-rounding, r2=0);

}

module base (r_bottom,height,rounding,connector_radius,ball_distance, c1,c2,c3) {
 union () {
 // connector
 color("white")cylinder(h=height+2*ball_distance+c1*2+c2*2+c3*2,r=connector_radius,$fn=60);
 //base
 color("DarkSlateBlue") cylinder (h=height-0,r=r_bottom-rounding,$fn=60);
 color("MediumSlateBlue")cylinder (h=height-rounding,r=r_bottom,$fn=60);
 translate([0,0,height-rounding]) color("SlateBlue") rotate_extrude() 
 translate([r_bottom-rounding,0,0]) circle(r=rounding,$fn=120);
 // circle (ball) 1, 2 and 3
 translate([0,0,height+ball_distance+c1]) color("Indigo")sphere(r=c1,center=true,$fn=60);
 translate([0,0,height+2*ball_distance+2*c1+c2]) color("Violet")sphere(r=c2,center=true,$fn=60);
 translate([0,0,height+3*ball_distance+2*c1+2*c2+c3]) color("Purple")sphere(r=c3,center=true,$fn=60);
 }
}

 

Go to the first part of the SCAD tutorial

Internet of (sex) things – part 3: Node-RED

in the second part of this tutorial we have seen how to use the MQTT protocol to send data across the internet. In the third part we show how to add additional functionalities to our sex toys. We want to enable sex toys to communicate and  to connect to social media. Although there are a lot of solutions from the Internet of Things (IoT) community Node-RED is outstanding as you could connect devices without or with little knowledge of programming languages: “NodeRED is a visual tool for wiring together hardware devices, APIs and online services – for wiring the Internet of Things.”  (Wikipedia). There are standard building blocks (called nodes) which are categorized as input, output, function and social nodes. You can select nodes and wire them to create a flow. A typical flow would look like that: input node- function node- output node. If you want to know more you can should have a look at this very good tutorial: http://noderedguide.com/

In this part of the tutorial we will receive and display data from the sex toy. And we want to send control commands to the sex toy. This can be achieved with a few flows in Node-RED:

node-red-overview

Installation of Node-RED:

  1. First you have to install “node.js”. Follow the instructions here.
  2. Now follow the node-red installation instruction.
    For Windows: Press the Windows button. Type in “CMD”. Windows should suggest the command shell app. Now RIGHT-click on the command shell app and select “open as administrator”. In the new command shell window type in

    npm install -g --unsafe-perm node-red
  3. Change to the Node-RED directory and start Node-RED by the command “node red” or “node red.js”
  4. Go to your browser and open http://127.0.0.1:1880/

If you don’t want to make a local installation of Node-RED the online service FRED (https://fred.sensetecnic.com/) offers a good alternative. FRED comes with additional nodes with extra functionalities.

Let’s start with a first flow. We want to control the LED and the motor of our IoT sex toys. Therefore we need two nodes: The input node “INJECT” and the output node “MQTT”. Select both nodes and drag them into the flow window in the middle. Wire both nodes. Then open the Inject-node (just double-click the node). Change the  payload to type “string” and type in the command for switching the LED. This command is taken from the second part of the tutorial:

{messageType : "execute",  actuator : "LED",  actuatorValue : 1 }

In addition you have to enter the topic that will be used for the MQTT message. It is “BIinTopic” – the “in” refers to the sex toy. Select a name like “set LED on”:inject-mode-led-on

Then edit the MQTT node. The name of the MQTT server must be entered. Leave the Topic field empty and the MQTT node will use the topic from the predecessor node INJECT.

mqtt-out-message-to-biNow press the deploy button. You should see the message “successful deployed”.

Now you can press one of the INJECT node button (the button is on the left side of the node) and the LED of the sex toy should go on.controlbi2byrednode

You can use the JSON commands from part 2 of the tutorial and make an INJECT node for each command. With just 5 flows you can control all functions of the vibrator from everywhere. Instead of the INJECT node you could use an Email or Twitter node (instead of the INJECT node) to control the sex toy eg by Email.

There are no file open or save menus in Node-RED. Instead the visual flow can be imported and exported using a simple text file. If you want to import the flow above download and unzip this text file. Select Import -> from clipboard and copy the text from the file to the clipboard. If you want to save the flow, select Export -> from clipboard and copy the text of the clipboard in a new text file.

Now let’s receive messages from the vibrator and parse them. You need a MQTT input node, a JSON function node, a SWITCH node and two DEBUG output node.

We will show how to retrieve the status of the LED. When the LED is on the JSON file includes: “LEDstatus: 1”. Otherwise the JSON file includes: “LEDstatus: 0”.

Edit the MQTT input node and enter the URL of the Mosquitto server and the topic “BIoutTopic”.

mqtt-in

Then add a DEBUG node and select “complete msg”. Wire MQTT and DEBUG node. This node will display the MQTT message in the debug slider (on the rights side). This is only for debugging – you will see if the message from the vibrator comes in (or not).

Now add a JSON function node and connect the MQTT node with the JSON node. The JSON function node will parse the text string which was sent via MQTT and transforms it to a JSON object.

Now select a SWITCH node. As property enter “payload.LEDstatus”. The switch node branches the flow according to LED status which was reported in the JSON file. Now we can test, if the LEDstatus is 0 or 1. For each comparison a line will be added.json-switch-node

Finally make two DEBUG output nodes and wire them with the SWITCH node. Complete the “msg” by adding “payload.LEDstatus”. If the flow reaches the DEBUG nodes you will see a message in the debug slider on the right.

ouputnodeled

 

Now you are ready and can press the deploy button. It should look like that:

analyse-json

Again, the visual flow can be imported. If you want to import the flow above download and unzip this text file. Select Import -> from clipboard and copy the text from the file to the clipboard.

Let us test the flow. You have to set the LED on. Press the “turn on” button in your browser as explained in part 2.vibr iot controlnodemcu prototype breadboard

 

Now have a look at the “debug” slider where you should see the result of the action. The first entry is the JSON file which was received. It is displayed by the DEBUG node “message”. In the second entry the DEBUG node (wired with the SWITCH node) displays 1 which means the LED is on.debug-window-led-on

 

With Node-RED you can add a SQL database to store all data, you can connect to social media and especially you can connect MULTIPLE sex toys and let them interact. Read the excellent guides for parsing JSON files and MQTT:

http://noderedguide.com/index.php/2015/10/28/node-red-lecture-3-basic-nodes-and-flows/#h.5zaw60nvfsyj

What we have achieved: In part 1 we have developed a wifi-enabled sex toy prototype based on the ESP8266. The toy was controlled through a web browser on a local smart phone / laptop. Local refers to the access point. Both the local smart phone / laptop and the ESP8266 must have access to the same access point (eg your router at home.)

In part 2 we opened our connections to the internet. With the fast MQTT protocol we are able to send and receive messages from anywhere. For data transmission  we use the JSON file format. We have sketched a protocol for sending data, commands and messages between sex toys and users.

In this part we introduced Node-RED a visual programming tool for the Internet of Things. With this tool we are able to connect sex toys at different locations, to store sensor data and to get social.

In the fourth part of the tutorial we will introduce User Interfaces to create a sex toy dashboard.

Internet of (sex) things – part 2: MQTT messages

In the first IOT tutorial we have shown how to build a sex toy based on a ESP8266 MCU. The ESP8266 is a microcontroller which can connect to the internet. You can write sketches with the Arduino IDE and connect a lot of actuator modules (like vibration motors, displays) and sensors (motion detection).

nodemcu prototype breadboard

In the first approach a web server was installed on the ESP8266. Control was possible by browsing to the web server, which could be accessed by a computer or smart phone using the same WiFi Access Point (AP).

browser vibrator control

In this second tutorial we will connect the ESP8266 to the internet and publish and receive data as well as commands by internet.

Protocols

There are some protocols for publishing (sending) data. We use the MQTT protocol which is very fast and suited for short messages. In addition we need a MQTT server. We will send the ESP8266 data to the server. And the ESP8266 can receive data (or commands) from the server. Other services can connect to the MQTT server, too. In this tutorial we will use a MQTT client which can display the sex toy data and send commands to the ESP8266.

mqtt-diagramm

Sex toy data exchange format

A big disadvantage of commercial sex toys is their proprietary data exchange formats. Kyle Machutis developed buttplug.io a Cross Platform Framework for Sex Toy Control to overcome this issue.

For this IOT project we will use the JSON format which is a very simple way to exchange data:

This is an example for the message type “sensor”. It says that the fusioned sensor data of the “mps9250” MPU is 5657, the LED is off (0), the motor is in mode sinus curve (2) and the speed of the vibration motor is 766.

{"messageType":"sensor",
"sensor":"mps9250",
"fusionedData":5675,
"messageNumber":8,
"LEDstatus":0,
"motor1mode":2,
"motor1speed":766}

There are three message types: sensor, execute and message.

  • Sensor is for publishing sensor data to everyone who is interested in that.
  • Execute is for controlling a specific device, eg for turning the motor on.
  • Message sends a text message to specific device. If the deviceID is not given it will be sent to all receivers,

For this project we need the

  • hardware from part 1 of the IOT project
  • the Arduino library JSON for parsing and encoding exchange data
  • a library for sending and receiving MQTT data
  • the mqtt-spy software to send and receive MQTT messages
  • optional: a MQTTserver like mosquitto

Arduino JSON library

There is a great library which can parse and build JSON files. Here is the documentation: https://github.com/bblanchon/ArduinoJson

Please go into the Arduino library manager and install the JSON package.

Arduino PubSubClient library

In addition we need a package for sending and receiving MQTT messages. You will find the PubSubClient library in the library manager, too.

Documentation: https://github.com/bblanchon/ArduinoJson

You have to change the maximum length of a message. By default it is only 128. Search for the file PubSubClient.h and change MQTT_MAX_PACKET_SIZE to 1024. On my Win10 system the file is located at

C:\Users\...\Documents\Arduino\libraries\PubSubClient\src\PubSubClient.h

Change the following line:

// MQTT_MAX_PACKET_SIZE : Maximum packet size
 #define MQTT_MAX_PACKET_SIZE 1024

MQTT-SPY software

This is an excellent piece of software which can connect to a MQTT server and send and receive messages: mqtt.spy. We use it to test the connection from the ESP8266 to the mosquitto server and for debugging our vibrator toy control software on the ESP8266.

Download from https://github.com/kamilfb/mqtt-spy/wiki/Downloads

If you haven’t your own MQTT server, you can use the Mosquito test server (only for testing, don’t spam them). Start mqtt-spy and connect to “test.mosquito.org”.

mqtt-start-screen

Subscription of messages: To receive the messages from the ESP8266  you have to subscribe to a topic. Use the same topic as in the source code, eg. “BIoutTopic”. You have to select the “New”-tab in the subscription, a new window pops up. Enter “BIoutTopic”. Now you receive all messages from the ESP8266.mqtt-client

Publishing messages: In the upper part of the window enter “BIinTopic”. In the “data” field you enter commands which will be sent to the ESP8266. Enter the commands and press “Publish”.

subscription-windowTry it out. Here are some examples:

JSON data exchange & command examples

Send message:

{
 messageType : "message",
 message : " Hello world!"
 }

Send Command – LED on:

{
 messageType : "execute",
 actuator : "LED",
 actuatorValue : 1
 }

Send command – motor1 modus is set to sinus curve vibration pattern

{
 messageType : "execute",
 actuator : "motor1",
 actuatorMode : "sinus"
 }

Send Command – set motor speed to 1000.

{
 messageType : "execute",
 actuator : "motor1",
 actuatorValue: 1000
 }

Send command – set motor1 off.

{
 messageType : "execute",
 actuator : "motor1",
 actuatorMode: "off"
 }

Message type “sensor”: this is for publishing sensor data of a sex toy (eg. position in 3d space, movement data, vibration pattern in use). These data can be received by other sex toys for vibration adjustment and synchronization of the vibration speed .

{
 messageType : "sensor",
 sensor: "mps9250",
 fusionedData: 10000,
 }

Remark: If it doesn’t work as expected, check the data field of the MQTT software. Paste & Copy doesn’t work as it should be and you may have to remove some redundant “{“-signs.

Code

The code is based on part 1. In the new code functions for publishing and receiving JSON data over MQTT are added.

Receiving and parsing incoming JSON files is done in “callback”. “callback” will be executed whenever a MQTT message comes in.

void callback(char* topic, byte* payload, unsigned int length) {

At first the incoming message is parsed and the result is stored in “root”. Now each entry in the JSON file can be accessed by assigning a new variable to root[entry]:

StaticJsonBuffer<500> jsonBuffer;
 JsonObject& root = jsonBuffer.parseObject(s);
 if (!root.success()) {
 Serial.println("parseObject() failed");
 } 
 String messageType = root["messageType"];

Build and publishing JSON files is done in the loop. A JsonObject “root” is created and then each entry in the JSON file is added by an assignment to root eg:  root[“messageType”] = “sensor”:

StaticJsonBuffer<500> jsonBuffer;
JsonObject& root = jsonBuffer.createObject();
root["messageType"] = "sensor"; // execute, message, sensor

For producing the JSON file there is “printTo” function. The JSON array of char must be formatted with the snprintf() function and then it can be published.

 root.printTo(outMsg, sizeof(outMsg));
 snprintf (msg,1000, "%s",outMsg);
 mqttclient.publish("BIoutTopic", msg);

Download the zipped and formatted code here: nodemcu-server-mqtt-iot.

In the next part of the tutorial we use Node-RED for visual programming our IOT sex toys.

Here is the complete source code for part 2 of the tutorial.

// bodyinteraction IOT project
// IOT sex toy prototype - control via browser and MQTT
#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>
#include <Wire.h>
#include <PubSubClient.h>
#include <ArduinoJson.h>

#define MPU9250_ADDRESS 0x68
#define MAG_ADDRESS 0x0C

#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_250_DPS 0x00
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_500_DPS 0x08
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_1000_DPS 0x10
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_2000_DPS 0x18

#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_2_G 0x00
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_4_G 0x08
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_8_G 0x10
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_16_G 0x18

const char* ssid = "ALICE-WLAN";
const char* password = "36s69c3756a65";
const char* mqtt_server = "test.mosquitto.org";

int ledPin = 0; // NodeMCU pad D3 = GPIO 0
int motorPin= 13; // NodeMCU pad D7 = GPIO 13
double sinusValue=0;

// define constants for four different vibration modes
const int offMode=0;
const int maxMode=1;
const int sinusMode=2;
const int motionMode=3;

int motorMode =offMode; //current mode
int motionVector = 0; //current fusioned motion
// Acceleration in x,y and z direction at t(ime)=1 and time=0
// Geroscop data
int16_t ax,ay,az,ax1,ay1,az1,gx,gy,gz,gx1,gy1,gz1;
int valueMotor; //vibrator motor speed 0-1023

WiFiServer server(80);

WiFiClient espclient;
PubSubClient mqttclient(espclient);
char msg[512];
char outMsg[512];

bool requesting=false; // is there a request eg button pressed on webpage

//timing of mqtt messages
long now=0;
long lastMsg = 0;


int value = 0;
int valueLED = LOW;

// This function read Nbytes bytes from I2C device at address Address.
// Put read bytes starting at register Register in the Data array.
void I2Cread(uint8_t Address, uint8_t Register, uint8_t Nbytes, uint8_t* Data)
{
// Set register address
Wire.beginTransmission(Address);
Wire.write(Register);
Wire.endTransmission();

// Read Nbytes
Wire.requestFrom(Address, Nbytes);
uint8_t index=0;
while (Wire.available())
Data[index++]=Wire.read();
}

// Write a byte (Data) in device (Address) at register (Register)
void I2CwriteByte(uint8_t Address, uint8_t Register, uint8_t Data)
{
// Set register address
Wire.beginTransmission(Address);
Wire.write(Register);
Wire.write(Data);
Wire.endTransmission();
}



// Return the response /generate webpage
void generateWebpage(WiFiClient espclient) {
espclient.println("HTTP/1.1 200 OK");
espclient.println("Content-Type: text/html");
espclient.println(""); // do not forget this one
espclient.println("<!DOCTYPE HTML>");
espclient.println("<html>");

espclient.print("Led pin is now: ");

if(valueLED == HIGH) {
espclient.print("On");
} else {
espclient.print("Off");
}

espclient.print("
Motor pin is now: ");
espclient.print(valueMotor);

espclient.println("

");
espclient.println("<a href=\"/LED=ON\"\"><button>Turn On </button></a>");
espclient.println("<a href=\"/LED=OFF\"\"><button>Turn Off </button></a>

");
espclient.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=MAX\"\"><button>Motor Max </button></a>");
espclient.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=OFF\"\"><button>Motor Off </button></a>");
espclient.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=SINUS\"\"><button>Motor sinus curve </button></a>");
espclient.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=MOTION\"\"><button>Motor motion controlled </button></a>
");
espclient.println("</html>");
}

// function callback is executed when a Mqtt message comes in
// - prints mqtt message
// - parse JSON file
// - execute commands
void callback(char* topic, byte* payload, unsigned int length) {
Serial.print("Message arrived [");
Serial.print(topic);
Serial.print("] ");
char s[length];
for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
Serial.print((char)payload[i]);
s[i]=payload[i];
}
StaticJsonBuffer<500> jsonBuffer;
JsonObject& root = jsonBuffer.parseObject(s);
if (!root.success()) {
Serial.println("parseObject() failed");
}
String messageType = root["messageType"]; //sensor, execute , message
String targetDeviceID = root["targetDeviceID"];
String actuator = root["actuator"];
int actuatorValue = root["actuatorValue"];
String actuatorMode = root["actuatorMode"];
String message = root["message"];
Serial.print("messageType: ");
Serial.println(messageType);
Serial.print("actuator: ");
Serial.println(actuator);
Serial.print("actuatorValue: ");
Serial.println(actuatorValue);

// print message
if (messageType=="message") {
Serial.print("Incoming message: ");
Serial.println(message);
}
// LED commands
if (messageType=="execute"&&actuator=="LED"&&actuatorValue==1) {
Serial.println("LED on received");
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
valueLED = HIGH;
}
if (messageType=="execute"&&actuator=="LED"&&actuatorValue==0) {
Serial.println("LED off received");
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
valueLED = LOW;
}
// set modes commands
if (messageType=="execute"&&actuator=="motor1"&&actuatorMode=="off") {
analogWrite(motorPin, 0);
valueMotor = 0;
motorMode=offMode;
}
if (messageType=="execute"&&actuator=="motor1"&&actuatorMode=="sinus") {
motorMode=sinusMode;
}
if (messageType=="execute"&&actuator=="motor1"&&actuatorMode=="motion") {
motorMode=motionMode;
valueMotor=600;
if (valueMotor<500) {valueMotor=500;} if (valueMotor>1023) {valueMotor=1023;}
}
// set motor speed command
if (messageType=="execute"&&actuator=="motor1"&&actuatorValue!=0) {
Serial.println("set motor speed to fixed value");
valueMotor=actuatorValue;
analogWrite(motorPin,valueMotor);
}
// incoming sensor data, adjust motor speed when in motion mode
int fusionedData = root["fusionedData"];
String sensor = root["sensor"];
if (messageType=="sensor"&&sensor=="mps9250"&&motorMode==motionMode) {
if (fusionedData > 5000) {valueMotor=valueMotor+25;} else {valueMotor=valueMotor-10;}
if (valueMotor<500) {valueMotor=500;} //values must be above 500 otherwise the motor is off if (valueMotor>1023) {valueMotor=1023;} // values higher than 1023 are not supported
analogWrite(motorPin, valueMotor); // set motor speed
}
generateWebpage(espclient);
}

// connect to mqtt server
void reconnect() {
while (!mqttclient.connected()) {
Serial.print("Attempting MQTT connection...");
// Create a random client ID
String clientId = "ESP8266Client-";
clientId += String(random(0xffff), HEX);
// Attempt to connect
if (mqttclient.connect(clientId.c_str())) {
Serial.println("connected");
mqttclient.subscribe("BIinTopic");
} else {
Serial.print("failed, rc=");
Serial.print(mqttclient.state());
Serial.println(" try again in 5 seconds");
delay(5000);
}
}
}

void setup() {
Wire.begin();
// connect MPU9265 via i²c bus
// NodeMCU D1 = GPIO5 connected to MCU9265 SCL
// NodeMCU D2 = GPIO4 connected to MCU9265 SDA
Wire.pins(5,4);
Serial.begin(115200);

// Configure gyroscope range
I2CwriteByte(MPU9250_ADDRESS,27,GYRO_FULL_SCALE_2000_DPS);
// Configure accelerometers range
I2CwriteByte(MPU9250_ADDRESS,28,ACC_FULL_SCALE_16_G);
// Set by pass mode for the magnetometers
I2CwriteByte(MPU9250_ADDRESS,0x37,0x02);

// Request first magnetometer single measurement
I2CwriteByte(MAG_ADDRESS,0x0A,0x01);

Serial.begin(115200);
delay(10);

// init LED pin
pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);

// init motor pin
pinMode(motorPin, OUTPUT);
analogWrite(motorPin, 0);

// Connect to WiFi network
Serial.println();
Serial.print("Connecting to ");
Serial.println(ssid);

WiFi.begin(ssid, password);

while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
delay(500);
Serial.print(".");
}
Serial.println("");
Serial.println("WiFi connected");

// Start the server
server.begin();
Serial.println("Server started");

// Print the IP address
Serial.print("Use this URL to connect: ");
Serial.print("http://");
Serial.print(WiFi.localIP());
Serial.println("/");

// init mqtt client
mqttclient.setServer(mqtt_server, 1883);
mqttclient.setCallback(callback);
}

void loop() {
if (!mqttclient.connected()) {
reconnect();
}
mqttclient.loop();

// Read accelerometer and gyroscope
uint8_t Buf[14];
I2Cread(MPU9250_ADDRESS,0x3B,14,Buf);

// Create 16 bits values from 8 bits data

// Accelerometer
ax=-(Buf[0]<<8 | Buf[1]);
ay=-(Buf[2]<<8 | Buf[3]);
az=Buf[4]<<8 | Buf[5];

// Gyroscope
gx=-(Buf[8]<<8 | Buf[9]);
gy=-(Buf[10]<<8 | Buf[11]);
gz=Buf[12]<<8 | Buf[13]; // when in "motionMode" the vibration motor is controlled by motion if (motorMode==motionMode) { motionVector=sqrt(pow(ax-ax1,2)+pow(ay-ay1,2)+pow(az-az1,2)); //calculate motion vector // adjust vibration motor speed // if motion vector > 5000 raise speed by 25
// otherwise lover speed by 10
// adjust these constants to your needs
if (motionVector > 5000) {valueMotor=valueMotor+25;} else {valueMotor=valueMotor-10;}
if (valueMotor<500) {valueMotor=500;} //values must be above 500 otherwise the motor is off if (valueMotor>1023) {valueMotor=1023;} // values higher than 1023 are not supported
analogWrite(motorPin, valueMotor); // set motor speed

Serial.print("motionVector: ");
Serial.print(motionVector);
Serial.print(", valueMotor: ");
Serial.println(valueMotor);
delay(200);

// save values
ax1=ax;
ay1=ay;
az1=az;
gx1=gx;
gy1=gy;
gz1=gz;
}

// change vibration motor speed according to a sinus curve
if (motorMode==sinusMode) {
sinusValue=sinusValue+.01;
delay(20);
int sinTmp = ((sin(sinusValue)+1)*.5*(1023-500))+500;
analogWrite(motorPin, sinTmp);
valueMotor=sinTmp;
}

StaticJsonBuffer<500> jsonBuffer;
JsonObject& root = jsonBuffer.createObject();
root["messageType"] = "sensor"; // execute, message, sensor
// execute - send command to other device
// root["targetDeviceID"] = "xxxxx"; //for execute and message message types
// root["actuator"] = "motor1";
// root["actuatorValue"]="222";
// root["actuatorMode"] = "sinus";
// root["command"] = none;
// root["commandParameter1"] ="";

// message - send message to targetDeviceID
// root["message"] = "hello world";

//sensor - for publishing sensor data
root["sensor"] = "mps9250";
// root["time"] = none;
root["fusionedData"] = motionVector;
root["messageNumber"] = 0;
// example for raw data
// JsonArray& rawdata = root.createNestedArray("rawdata"); // x,y,z,roll, pitch better??
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // ax
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // ay
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // az
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // gx
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // gx
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // gx
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // mx
// rawdata.add(0, 0); // mx
// rawdata.add(0, 0); //mx
root["LEDstatus"] = valueLED;
root["motor1mode"] = motorMode;
root["motor1speed"] = valueMotor;

// publish motor speed as mqtt message every 10 seconds
// only when motor in not off
if (motorMode==maxMode||motorMode==sinusMode||motorMode==motionMode) {
now = millis();
if (now - lastMsg > 1000) {
if (!mqttclient.connected()) {
reconnect();
}
lastMsg = now;
++value;
root["messageNumber"] = value;
// publish data as MQTT message in JSON format
root.printTo(outMsg, sizeof(outMsg));
snprintf (msg, 1000, "%s",outMsg);
mqttclient.publish("BIoutTopic", msg);
Serial.print("Publish message every 10 sec: ");
Serial.println(msg);
}
}

// Check if a client has connected to the wifi server
WiFiClient espclient = server.available();
if (!espclient) {
return;
}

while(!espclient.available()){
delay(1);
}

// read the first line of the request
String request = espclient.readStringUntil('\r');
espclient.flush();

// LED on button pressed
Serial.println("hi execute rqeuest");
if (request.indexOf("/LED=ON") != -1) {
requesting=true;
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
valueLED = HIGH;
root["LEDstatus"] = valueLED;
}
// LED off button pressed
if (request.indexOf("/LED=OFF") != -1) {
requesting=true;
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
valueLED = LOW;
root["LEDstatus"] = valueLED;
}
// set motor to maximum speed button pressed
if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=MAX") != -1) {
requesting=true;
analogWrite(motorPin, 1023);
valueMotor = 1023;
motorMode=maxMode;
root["motor1mode"] = motorMode;
root["motor1speed"] = valueMotor;
}
// set motor off button pressed
if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=OFF") != -1) {
requesting=true;
analogWrite(motorPin, 0);
valueMotor = 0;
motorMode=offMode;
root["motor1mode"] = motorMode;
root["motor1speed"] = valueMotor;
}
// motor amplitude controlled like a sinus curve
if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=SINUS") != -1) {
requesting=true;
motorMode=sinusMode;
root["motor1mode"] = motorMode;
root["motor1speed"] = valueMotor;
}
// motor speed is adjusted by movements (classical "body interaction" interaction pattern)
if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=MOTION") != -1) {
requesting=true;
motorMode=motionMode;
valueMotor=600;
root["motor1mode"] = motorMode;
root["motor1speed"] = valueMotor;
}


generateWebpage(espclient);

// send outMessage to Mqtt server
if (requesting) {
requesting=false;
if (!mqttclient.connected()) {
reconnect();
}
++value;

root["messageNumber"] = value;
root["motor1mode"] = motorMode;
root["motor1speed"] = valueMotor;

// publish data as MQTT message in JSON format
root.printTo(outMsg, sizeof(outMsg));
snprintf (msg,1000, "%s",outMsg);
mqttclient.publish("BIoutTopic", msg);

Serial.print("Publish message: ");
Serial.println(msg);
}
}

Exploring the internet of (sex) things 1

The internet of things – or short IOT – is getting popular. IOT is a network of physical things like vehicles, buildings, but also everyday objects like lamps, refrigerators. IOT allows objects to be sensed and controlled remotely across the Internet. As a result the physical world will be integrated into the internet and computer systems.

Popular examples are home axiomatization or collection of environmental data.  Even sex toy industry use the internet to connect sex toy users which are far away of each other (like the OhMiBod blueMotion). The vision of remote sex driven by technology is also known as Teledildonics. Unfortunately I didn’t pay much attention to this movement which goes back to 1975. body interaction focused more on wireless connected sex toys for users having sex together and want to integrate his and her’s sex toy. You will find a lot of information at Kyle Machulis site Metafetish. Also have a look at the annual conference Arse Elektronika which focus on the intersection of technology and sex.

In this blog I have already shown how to connect the body interaction development board to the internet. Now I will present some first steps into IOT. I will use the NodeMCU development board which is based on the popular ESP8266 System on a chip. The ESP is a wi-fi enabled microcontroller where you can connect sensors and actuators. It can connect to your wi-fi access point and home and it can be an access point itself and host eg. an internet server.

In my explorations I will try to find out if a IOT sex toy is useful for DIY sex toy community.

In this blog post we will use the ESP8266 as a wi-fi server. The server will connect to your wi-fi access point at home.

Building a bread board prototype

nodemcu prototype breadboard

Material needed

  • bread board, wires
  • Node MCU or similar
  • small vibration motor (or LED), eg the Lilipad vibration motor
  • optional: accelerometer  MPU9265
  • optional: another LED and a resistor

WIre MPU9265

mpu-92-65Connect

  • SCL (on MPU9265) and D1 (on NodeMCU),
  • SDA and D2,
  • VCC and 3V3
  • GND and GND

 

Wire vibration motor

Connect

  • D7 (node MCU) with vibration motor (+) and
  • GND (NodeMCU) and (-)

Wire LED

Connect:

  • D3 (NodeMCU) and LED (long end)
  • LED (short end) and resistor
  • resistor and GND (NodeMCU)

Using the Arduino IDE

NodeMCU and all other ESP8266 boards are not supported by Arduino. But you can use the Arduino board manager to add other development boards. This short Tutorial explains the necessary steps: http://www.instructables.com/id/Quick-Start-to-Nodemcu-ESP8266-on-Arduino-IDE/

Connect the NodeMCU to your access point (WLAN router)

Upload script to NodeMCU

Copy the code to Arduino IDE.

Within the sketch you have to change the constants SSID and password. Use the same SSID as you would do to connect your smart phone or computer to the internet.

Select your NodeMCU and the port. Connect your computer and the NodeMCU with USB wire. Upload the script to NodeMCU

#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>
#include <Wire.h>
 
#define MPU9250_ADDRESS 0x68
#define MAG_ADDRESS 0x0C
 
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_250_DPS 0x00 
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_500_DPS 0x08
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_1000_DPS 0x10
#define GYRO_FULL_SCALE_2000_DPS 0x18
 
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_2_G 0x00 
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_4_G 0x08
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_8_G 0x10
#define ACC_FULL_SCALE_16_G 0x18
 
const char* ssid = "????"; // Enter the name of your Access point
const char* password = "????"; //Enter the password SSID 
int ledPin = 0; // NodeMCU pad D3 = GPI0 
int motorPin= 13; // NodeMCU pad D7 = GPIO 13
double sinusValue=0;

// define constants for four different vibration modes
const int off_mode=0;
const int max_mode =1;
const int sinus_mode =2;
const int motion_mode =3;

int motor_mode =off_mode;

WiFiServer server(80);

 // This function read Nbytes bytes from I2C device at address Address. 
// Put read bytes starting at register Register in the Data array. 
void I2Cread(uint8_t Address, uint8_t Register, uint8_t Nbytes, uint8_t* Data)
{
 // Set register address
 Wire.beginTransmission(Address);
 Wire.write(Register);
 Wire.endTransmission();
 
 // Read Nbytes
 Wire.requestFrom(Address, Nbytes); 
 uint8_t index=0;
 while (Wire.available())
 Data[index++]=Wire.read();
}

// Write a byte (Data) in device (Address) at register (Register)
void I2CwriteByte(uint8_t Address, uint8_t Register, uint8_t Data)
{
 // Set register address
 Wire.beginTransmission(Address);
 Wire.write(Register);
 Wire.write(Data);
 Wire.endTransmission();
}

void setup() {

 Wire.begin();
 // NodeMCU D1 = GPIO5 connected to MCU9265 SCL 
 // NodeMCU D2 = GPIO4 connected to MCU9265 SDA
 Wire.pins(5,4); 
 Serial.begin(115200);
 
 // Configure gyroscope range
 I2CwriteByte(MPU9250_ADDRESS,27,GYRO_FULL_SCALE_2000_DPS);
 // Configure accelerometers range
 I2CwriteByte(MPU9250_ADDRESS,28,ACC_FULL_SCALE_16_G);
 // Set by pass mode for the magnetometers
 I2CwriteByte(MPU9250_ADDRESS,0x37,0x02);
 
 // Request first magnetometer single measurement
 I2CwriteByte(MAG_ADDRESS,0x0A,0x01);
 
 Serial.begin(115200);
 delay(10);
 
 pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
 digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
 
 pinMode(motorPin, OUTPUT);
 analogWrite(motorPin, 0);
 
 // Connect to WiFi network
 Serial.println();
 Serial.println();
 Serial.print("Connecting to ");
 Serial.println(ssid);
 
 WiFi.begin(ssid, password);
 
 while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
 delay(500);
 Serial.print(".");
 }
 Serial.println("");
 Serial.println("WiFi connected");
 
 // Start the server
 server.begin();
 Serial.println("Server started");
 
 // Print the IP address
 Serial.print("Use this URL to connect: ");
 Serial.print("http://");
 Serial.print(WiFi.localIP());
 Serial.println("/");
 
}

int16_t ax,ay,az,ax1,ay1,az1,gx,gy,gz,gx1,gy1,gz1; 
int valueMotor; //vibrator motor speed 0-1023

void loop() {
 
 // Read accelerometer and gyroscope
 uint8_t Buf[14];
 I2Cread(MPU9250_ADDRESS,0x3B,14,Buf);
 
 // Create 16 bits values from 8 bits data
 
 // Accelerometer
 ax=-(Buf[0]<<8 | Buf[1]);
 ay=-(Buf[2]<<8 | Buf[3]);
 az=Buf[4]<<8 | Buf[5];
 
 // Gyroscope
 gx=-(Buf[8]<<8 | Buf[9]);
 gy=-(Buf[10]<<8 | Buf[11]);
 gz=Buf[12]<<8 | Buf[13];

 // when in "motion_mode" the vibration motor is controlled by motion
 if (motor_mode==motion_mode) {
 int v = 0;
 v=sqrt(pow(ax-ax1,2)+pow(ay-ay1,2)+pow(az-az1,2)); //calculate motion vector
 // adjust vibration motor speed
 // if motion vector > 5000 raise speed by 25
 // otherwise lover speed by 10
 // adjust these constants to your needs
 if (v > 5000) {valueMotor=valueMotor+25;} else {valueMotor=valueMotor-10;}
 if (valueMotor<500) {valueMotor=500;} //values must be above 500 otherwise the motor is off
 if (valueMotor>1023) {valueMotor=1023;} // values higher than 1023 are not supported
 analogWrite(motorPin, valueMotor); // set motor speed
 
 Serial.print("v: ");
 Serial.print(v);
 Serial.print(", valueMotor: ");
 Serial.println(valueMotor);
 delay(200);

 // save values
 ax1=ax;
 ay1=ay;
 az1=az;
 gx1=gx;
 gy1=gy;
 gz1=gz;
 }

 // change vibration motor speed according to a sinus curve
 if (motor_mode==sinus_mode) {
 sinusValue=sinusValue+.01;
 delay(20);
 int sin_tmp = ((sin(sinusValue)+1)*.5*(1023-500))+500;
 Serial.println(sin_tmp);
 analogWrite(motorPin, sin_tmp);
 valueMotor=sin_tmp;
 }
 
 // Check if a client has connected
 WiFiClient client = server.available();
 if (!client) {
 return;
 }
 
 // Wait until the client sends some data
 Serial.println("new client");
 while(!client.available()){
 delay(1);
 }
 
 // Read the first line of the request
 String request = client.readStringUntil('\r');
 Serial.println(request);
 client.flush();
 
 // Match the request
 
 int valueLED = LOW;
 if (request.indexOf("/LED=ON") != -1) {
 digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
 valueLED = HIGH;
 }
 if (request.indexOf("/LED=OFF") != -1) {
 digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
 valueLED = LOW;
 }

 if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=MAX") != -1) {
 analogWrite(motorPin, 1023);
 valueMotor = 1023;
 motor_mode=max_mode;
 }
 if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=OFF") != -1) {
 analogWrite(motorPin, 0);
 valueMotor = 0;
 motor_mode=off_mode;
 }

 if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=SINUS") != -1) {
 motor_mode=sinus_mode;
 }

 if (request.indexOf("/MOTOR=MOTION") != -1) {
 motor_mode=motion_mode;
 valueMotor=600;
 }
 
 // Return the response
 client.println("HTTP/1.1 200 OK");
 client.println("Content-Type: text/html");
 client.println(""); // do not forget this one
 client.println("<!DOCTYPE HTML>");
 client.println("<html>");
 
 client.print("Led pin is now: ");
 
 if(valueLED == HIGH) {
 client.print("On");
 } else {
 client.print("Off");
 }
 
 client.print("<br>Motor pin is now: ");
 client.print(valueMotor);

 client.println("<br><br>");
 client.println("<a href=\"/LED=ON\"\"><button>Turn On </button></a>");
 client.println("<a href=\"/LED=OFF\"\"><button>Turn Off </button></a><br><br>"); 
 client.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=MAX\"\"><button>Motor Max </button></a>");
 client.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=OFF\"\"><button>Motor Off </button></a>"); 
 client.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=SINUS\"\"><button>Motor sinus curve </button></a>");
 client.println("<a href=\"/MOTOR=MOTION\"\"><button>Motor motion controlled </button></a><br>"); 
 client.println("</html>");
 
 delay(1);
 Serial.println("Client disonnected");
 Serial.println("");
 
}

Controlling the vibrator prototype

After uploading the script above, open the serial monitor. After some time the NodeMCU will report “wifi connected”.

IOT wifi connectdNow start a browser. Use the URL which the NodeMCU reported eg. http://192.168.1.12/

 

If your smart phone is connected to the same Access point as your computer is, you can use your smart phone to control the prototype, too.

 

You can turn the LED on or off by pressing the “Turn On” and “Turn Off” buttons.

For controlling the motor you have 4 options

  • motor on
  • motor off
  • sinus curve (the motor will speed up and slow down according to a sinus curve)
  • motion controlled (more motion -> motor speeds up)

Summary

To build a vibrator prototype based on the ESP8266 MCU is very easy. You can use your Arduino IDE to upload scripts to the prototype. Then you can control the vibration motor through a browser. If you don’t want to use these external control options the vibrator prototype can be controlled by motion similar to the body interaction vibrator development board.

In this blog post series we will  explore other interesting features of the ESP8266:

  • the ESP8266 as an access point (no need for private or public access points)
  • over the air (OTA) uploading of sketches  (wireless – no USB connector needed)
  • MQTT protocol & server
  • Node-RED (visual IOT programming)
  • review of development boards for building IOT vibrators

New vibrator design “fusion”

 

fusion-quer-look-throughbodyinteraction designed a lot of vibrating toys, some are usable as massage devices, some are explicit sex toys (vibrator ring, balls), some are experimental (collar). Everyone is motion controlled. If you have more than one they will influence each other remotely, eg. a vibrator and a vibrator ring.

unboxing-3

But a device like a classic big vibrator is still missing. So we designed the “fusion” which is approx 19cm long and up to 4+cm in diameter. It is called fusion as the case is made of silicone and 3d printed material (ABS).

fusion-quer-2

We have put the body interaction vibrator development board, motor and battery in a silicone form. There is an on/off switch – so when you travel the vibrator doesn’t wake up when it is moved. And you can charge the battery with a USB micro connector. There is a spacious inlay for the electronics, so it will be easy to get it done.

Pros:

  • easy to charge the battery via USB
  • on/off switch
  • hard handle
  • flexible upper part
  • large (if you like this)
  • ISP interface (“hacker port”) accessible

Cons:

  • only the silicone part of the form can be put under water for cleaning

What do you need?

  • 200 ml silicone with high shore A rate, eg. shore A 45 from silikonfabrik.de
  • optional: special colour for silicone molding
  • 3d print of the molding form, inlay and closure
  • tinker wire
  • body interaction vibrator development board with LiPo and motor (or similar Arduino boards)
  • bin for preparing the silicone, something to stir the silicone

How much is it?

  • Board, battery, motor: 30$ (buy at Tindie)
  • Silicone: 10$
  • 3d Prints: less than 5$

Step by step instructions

Step 1: Print out the inlay, the form and the enclosure

round_something_05_final

Download as zip-file: Fusion

Download at Thingiverse: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1505539

Step 2: Prepare the inlay: Insert the body interaction board and the LiPo battery

The body interaction vibrator development board is inserted into the provided rails. It it doesn’t fit in use a file to remove printing artefacts. Use some glue to fix the board. Then insert the battery and fix it.

Important: The Micro USB connector must be above the upper part of the inlay.

inlay with description

Step 3: fix the wires of the vibration motor

The vibration motor will hang down from the inlay as the inlay will be put in the form upside down. You can influence the position of the motor by shortening the wire or fixing the wire to e.g. to the battery. In this case the wire of the motor was threaded between battery and board. Therefore the  motor will be in the middle of the vibrator.

inlay-inner-partfusion-looking-through-2in the center there is the overmolded vibration motor

Step 5: Prepare the form

Use some tinker wire to “press” both parts of the form tight together.molding-form-emptyUse some wax to fix little holes in the form where the printer failed. (These are the white spots)

drying-form-with-wax

Step 6: Insert inlay into the form

There must be some space between inlay and form for the silicone.

Remark: The two wedge like forms at both sides of the inlay help to hold the inlay. The wedge can be removed after molding.inlay-in-molding-form

Step 7: Cast the silicone

Prepare the silicone as the producer recommends. It takes some time to pour the large amount of silicone into the narrow form. The silicone we use must be used within 10 minutes. So start at once after preparing the silicone.

Important: The USB micro connector, the switch and the ISP connector shouldn’t be dashed with silicone. If this happens remove the silicone. Maybe some silicone will remain behind. This can be removed later when the silicone is solid.molded

The battery is covered with silicone, the USB connecor and switch are not.drying-seen-from-top

Step 8: Remove the form

Remove the tinker wire. Remove overhanging part of the silicone. Carefully tear both parts of the form away. You can use a knife, but be careful not to “hurt” the vibrator. Remove overhanging silicone at the vibrator. Also remove the two wedge like forms at both sides of the inlay.

unboxing-fusionfusion looking through complete

Step 9: Install the closure

Now you can put the closure on the inlay. Fix the closure with glue. (Be careful! The USB connector is not very strong.) closed-inlayround_something_055_final_cap_onlyfusion-closure

Tinker, share and download from Tinkercad:

form and inlay: https://tinkercad.com/things/b8nQxRn4XWl

closure: https://tinkercad.com/things/dhgtgeaYG0B

Download as zip-file: Fusion

Download at Thingiverse:

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1505539

 

Programming Tutorial part 4: Sinus

Nervous Optic by Ben Felten, CC BY-ND 2.0

Nervous Optic by Ben Felten, CC BY-ND 2.0

In tutorial 3 – “ramps” we learned how to repeat instructions again and again using the for statement. In this tutorial we need the for loop again, bur instead of changing the motor speed by a constant value we want a more dynamic behavior. Therefore we use the sinus function – a classical pattern used for controlling vibrators.

Here is a straight forward approach:

for (float i = 0; i < 20000; i = i + 0.05) {
  analogWrite(motor, (sin(i)); //motor speed set to sin(i) 
} 
delay(20); 

We are changing the variable i in small steps of 0.05. So the variable i will become 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0,2 … and so on.

But this doesn’t work. Let’s have a look at the sinus function. Just use the google search and type in “sin(x)”. You will see  the following curve:

sin(x) in google

There are two problems:

  • There are values below 0 (on the vertical or y-axis). If the value is 0 or below 0 the motor is off.
  • The maximal value is 1. But  we need values between the minimal motor speed (around 40) and the maximal speed (always 255).

You can try to adjust the function and visualize it with google search. Maybe you will discover an interesting variant of the sinus curve.

We use the following function:

(sin(x)+1) 0.5 * (maximal motor speed – minimal motor speed)) + minimal motor speed

  • Sin(x)+1: add 1 to get positive values only between 0 and 2 instead of -1 and 1.
  • Multiply by 0.5: get values between 0 an 1 instead 0 and 2
  • Multiply with maximal motor speed  (255) – minimal motor speed (40): values are now between 0 and 215
  • Add minimal speed: values are between 40 and 255. So the motor will always be on.

 

google_sin

This is the script. Please have a look at tutorial 2 if you don’t know how to upload the script.

 // www.bodyinteraction.com tutorial sinus 
int motor = 3; 
int minimal_motorspeed = 50; 

void setup() { 
  pinMode(motor, OUTPUT); 
} 
void loop() { 
  for (float i = 0; i < 20000; i = i + 0.05) { 
    analogWrite(motor, ((sin(i) + 1) * 0.5 * 215) + 40); 
    delay(5); 
  } 
} 

If you want to slow down the changes in the motor speed change delay(5) and take larger values.

Go back to tutorial 3: ramps

Programming the body interaction 1 – part 3 – ramps

Ramps

by darkday, CC BY 2.0

“Milf Ramp attack” by darkday, CC BY 2.0

In this tutorial the continuous change of the vibration motor speed is regarded. Typical vibrator pattern are ramps. They start at a given value. Then the motor speed is continuously changed. The values could be increasing or decreasing.

In our example we have two ramps.

  • Increasing ramp: It starts with the minimal motor speed (40). The vibration is slowly increased up to maximal speed (255).
  • Decreasing ramp: It starts with maximal motor speed and decreases very fast until minimal motor speed is reached.

 

 

ramps

We will achieve this by using the for statement.

for (int i=minimal_motorspeed; i &lt;=255; i++) {
  analogWrite(motor, i);
  delay(10); // wait for 1/100 second
}

The code after the for statement will be repeated so long a condition remains true.

  • int i =minimal_motorspeed: a new local variable i is introduced and given the value of minimal_motorspeed (40)
  • i <= 255: this is the condition – until the variable is below or equal 255 the code will be executed
  • i++: each time the code is executed the variable i will be increased by 1

The values of i are 40, 41, 42, 43, … , 255. We use the variable i to change the motor speed. The speed of the motor will be changed at each iteration. So the motor speed will be set to 40 (which is the minimal speed), 41, 42, …, 255 using the following statement:

analogWrite(motor, i);

The delay statement changes the pitch of the ramp. If the delay time is high the pitch will be low:

delay(10);

 

The following code will realize the function visualized above. You can change the pitch by adjusting the delay time.

// www.bodyinteraction.com tutorial ramp
int motor=3;
int minimal_motorspeed=40;
void setup() {
  pinMode(motor, OUTPUT);
}
void loop() {
  for (int i=minimal_motorspeed; i &lt;=255; i++) {
    analogWrite(motor, i);
    delay(10);
  }
  for (int i=255; i &gt; minimal_motorspeed; i--) {
    analogWrite(motor, i);
    delay(2);
  }
  analogWrite(motor, 0); //motor off
  delay(1000);
}

Copy the code to Arduino and try out. In tutorial 2 it is explained how to upload the code to the body interaction 1.

Next tutorial: Classical vibration pattern – the sinus curve

Go back to tutorial acceleration

Danniel Ramirez, CC BY 2.0

Ramp to the beach by Danniel Ramirez, CC BY 2.0

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